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3rd Grade Ecosystems: Fun Activities for Fossils, Adaptations, and Animal Groups

Are you looking for fun and engaging activities to help your 3rd graders learn about interdependent relationships in ecosystems? Do you want to bring fossil studies, animal adaptations, and groups of animals together in an enjoyable way? Then we have just the activities to help you do that!

In this blog post, we will share various activities students can use explore fossils, examine the effects of environmental changes, and discover how animals benefit from living in groups. Bring hard concepts to life in a kid-friendly way with the activities in this unit!

Learning About Animals in Groups

In the first part of this unit, students will learn about animal groups. Through posters, mini books, interactive notebooks, and hands-on science activities, your students will learn about some of the benefits to animals living in groups.

Studying Fossils

Next, your students will love learning about different types of fossils. From learning about paleontologists to learning different types of fossils, your students will be engaged with the kid-friendly materials. By the end of this section, your students will understand what types of information can be learned from fossils.

Learning About Plant and Animal Adaptations and Survival

The third part of this science unit teaches students all about plant and animal adaptations. From camouflage to hibernation to behavioral and physical plant and animal adaptations, your students will learn these concepts through mini books, practice pages, and interactive notebooks.

Learning About Environmental Changes

In the final part of the unit, students will learn about environmental changes and the effects they can have on plants and animals. From deforestation to drought, to pollution, students will learn about the causes and effects of different environmental changes.

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